Tag Archives: Inkaterra Machu Picchu

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The Tea Processing at Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel

The variety of tea in the Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel are two: Tea of India and Gold Tea, although each type of tea has a different taste, smell and visual appearance. The tea processing for each of the different flavours consists of a very similar set of methods.

At Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel we cultivate our organic tea free of chemicals so our guests can appreciate quality organic tea. This is the process we take:

We harvest the leaves when the new shoots begin to grow. The collection lasts about a day and new outbreaks are started.

Then they are placed in the dryer. Wilting begins and is intended to soften and make pliable sheets to roll them without breaking them.

The leaf age guideline must be between 25 and 30 days, since this determines the quality in the production of tea.

The damp tea leaves are then rolled to be formed into wrinkled strips, by hand or by using a rolling machine. This rolling action also causes some of the sap, essential oils, and juices inside the leaves to ooze out, which further enhances the taste of the tea. The rolled leaves are placed in a ceramic bowl for a period of 12 hours with a humid atmosphere and a constant temperature of 22 grades.

Drying is the process which aims to stop the fermentation at the desired time. A loose drying process produces a tea high in water and can run the risk of mildew. A strong or long drying process removes the tea aroma, making a large amount of insoluble substances in the leaf.

When completed the process of drying of leaves, the last stage is the selection. The tea leaves are passed through sieves of different sizes that fall in different degrees. The ranking is based on the appearance and leaf size, not the quality or flavour.

Whilst staying at Inkaterra’s Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel, make sure to experience these sensational aroma teas, whilst emerging yourself in the timeless spirit of the LostCity of the Incas.

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Explore Machu Picchu in 3D

 

Surrounded by mountains, the Inca Citadel is one of the most beautiful places to visit. Maybe this ancient city of Andean civilizations is one of the reasons why Machu Picchu was recognised as one of the New 7 Wonders of the World. Have a look at this amazing 3D-Website created by the newspaper El Comercio to celebrate the 5th anniversary of this recognition and enjoy discovering some hidden stories about the lost city of the Incas.

Machu Picchu is home of Inkaterra’s Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel.

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Inkaterra Staff – Interview: Carmen Soto, Orchid Specialist

We interview Carmen Soto – resident biologist and orchid specialist at Inkaterra Machu Picchu!

When did you start working for Inkaterra? Tell us a bit about your professional background.

I started working at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel thirteen years ago; I am a biology graduate of the Cusco National San Antonio Abad University, I am the Inkaterra NGO, Inka Terra Asociación´s, coordinator at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel in charge of conservation projects and research on its flora and fauna. Continue reading

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Machu Picchu Rediscovered at the Royal Geographical Society

Celebrations marking 100 years since the discovery of Machu Picchu took place throughout last year, but there’s justified reason to extend the centenary.

Addressing a full audience of Royal Geographical Society members, author and explorer Hugh Thomson last night gave an illuminating talk about the complicated discovery of the ‘Lost City of the Incas’, and how the process was more drawn out than you might think.

As it turns out, Hiram Bingham stumbled across the expansive site by accident in 1911. He was certainly looking for Incan ruins – just not these ones. As Thomson dryly noted, ‘people only find what they’re looking for’. Continue reading